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Pizza Delivery Man Pranked by 'Secret Society'

Pizza Delivery Man Pranked by 'Secret Society'


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File this under "April Fools pranks to pull this year." San Diego, Calif., photographer Tim King decided to host a special type of party for his birthday this year, hosting a small get-together in his house. Even better? They pulled off a benign but hilarious prank on the pizza delivery guy.

"I decorated my place with tea lights and candelabras — and prepared monk robes for everyone to wear as if it were a ‘secret society meeting’," King wrote on his blog. "I also filled my refrigerator with 40s of beer as it’s something I’ve always wanted to do."

Then, he apparently ran across some animal masks, had everyone don the masks and robes, and ordered some pizza. "We all put on the masks, and my friend Rich had the genius idea to play the Pandora station for 'chanting monks,'" he wrote. The Hoboken pizza guy showed up, and took everything in stride. "This looks awesome... don't know if I wanna come in but I will anyways.... holy sh*t," he says. In the end, he even played the part, asking, "Who's going to put their print on this receipt?" and leaving them with, "Have a bountiful feast." Watch the entire prank below, and remember to whip this out for Halloween, too.


Pizzagate conspiracy theory

"Pizzagate" is a debunked conspiracy theory that went viral during the 2016 United States presidential election cycle. [2] [3] [4] It has been extensively discredited by a wide range of organizations, including the Washington, D.C. police. [3] [4] [5]

In March 2016, the personal email account of John Podesta, Hillary Clinton's campaign manager, was hacked in a spear-phishing attack. WikiLeaks published his emails in November 2016. Proponents of the Pizzagate conspiracy theory falsely claimed the emails contained coded messages that connected several high-ranking Democratic Party officials and U.S. restaurants with an alleged human trafficking and child sex ring. One of the establishments allegedly involved was the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria in Washington, D.C. [6] [7]

Members of the alt-right, conservative journalists, and others who had urged Clinton's prosecution over the emails, spread the conspiracy theory on social media outlets such as 4chan, 8chan, and Twitter. [8] In response, a man from North Carolina traveled to Comet Ping Pong to investigate the conspiracy and fired a rifle inside the restaurant to break the lock on a door to a storage room during his search. [9] The restaurant owner and staff also received death threats from conspiracy theorists. [10]

Pizzagate is generally considered a predecessor to the QAnon conspiracy theory. Pizzagate resurged in 2020, mainly due to QAnon. While initially it was spread by only the far-right, it has since been spread by teens on TikTok "who don't otherwise fit a right-wing conspiracy theorist mold": the biggest Pizzagate spreaders on TikTok appear to otherwise be mostly interested in topics of viral dance moves and Black Lives Matter. [11] The conspiracy theory has developed and become less partisan and political in nature, with less emphasis on Clinton and more on the alleged worldwide elite of child sex-traffickers. [12]


Examples:

  • AKIRA: The underground activists infiltrate the military research compound where Tetsuo is being held by pretending to come for cable repair service.
  • In the second season of Darker Than Black, the Anti-Hero, Hei, kidnaps someone after disguising himself as a delivery guy. In fact, this is kind of a stock-in-trade, as he frequently does infiltrations by going undercover doing some kind of menial labor&mdashjob changing has become a Running Gag among fans and in the series itself.
  • My Hero Academia: During the Hideout Raid arc, Edgeshot announces the Heroes' arrival by knocking on the door and claiming he's pizza delivery to the League of Villains, much to to their confusion. right before All Might smashes through the wall with Gran Torino and Kamui Woods right behind him.
  • Ghost In The Shell Standalone Complex.
    • Played with when Kusanagi hacks a hotel maidbot to find out what's going on during a Yakuza meeting. This comes to an abrupt halt when a shootout occurs and the bot catches a stray bullet.
    • To enter a Yakuza hangout, Kusanagi pretends to be picking up the garbage. When the Yakuza refuse to let her in, she insists they have to sign the required paperwork (Japan has strict recycling laws) which is on a clipboard too large to pass through the peep slot.
    • Detective Walsh does this in Strangers in Paradise in order to make contact with Katchoo while she's working for Darcy. Of course, he's delivering pizza.
    • The Super Mario Adventures comic had Luigi (in disguise) 'order' pizza for the Koopalings to give Yoshi, Toad and Peach a chance to enter Bowser's Castle armed with a ton of bombs.
    • In Hunt Harry and Hermione gain entrance to Umbridge's house by pretending to be delivering chocolate from Honeydukes.
    • Lampshaded humourously in Madagascar. Alex decides to join Marty's safehouse along with Melman and Gloria on the titular island where the Zoosters are stranded. He knocks on the door and this conversation occurs:
    • A non-infiltration example in 16 Wishes when Abby accidentally wishes herself into an adult and is forced to live in her own apartment. At the end of the film, Celeste shows up at her doorstep "delivering" a pizza. Abby is fully aware that she didn't order a pizza, but Celeste says it was just an excuse to come over and console her.
    • Used in the opening scene of Ace Ventura to infiltrate the apartment of a man who has stolen a puppy from his ex-girlfriend.
    • In the beginning of Airheads, Chazz sneaks into Palatine Records this way to try and show his band's demo tape to the executives. Judging by the reactions of the security guards and a secretary, this isn't the first time he's done this.
    • There's a Bait-and-Switch in The Art of War (2000) when Wesley Snipes appears to be using Marie Matiko's character to infiltrate a Triad brothel, which is hidden behind a Front Organisation of a restaurant. Instead he handcuffs her to the steering wheel, grabs a crate of groceries which are being unloaded from a truck, and walks in that way.
    • In Blue Streak, Miles Logan (Martin Lawrence) attempts to get into the police station with this trick. He fails, as the cop tells him that only two kinds of people get through that door: cops and criminals. Miles tries the next best thing - steal a detective's entry card and have a forger make a copy for him, as well as documents proving that Miles is a kick-ass detective from another precinct.
    • The Dark Knight Rises: Bane enters the Stock Exchange by posing as a motorcycle delivery man, wearing a full-visor helmet to hide his gas mask. One of his accomplices, Petrov, poses as a food delivery man to get a pistol onto the trading floor.
    • In Den of Thieves, Donnie gets a job at as a delivery guy at a nearby Chinese restaurant knowing that employees at the Federal Reserve often order lunch from there and he will be legitimately allowed into the building to deliver it. This forms part of his exit strategy following the heist.
    • Done in the movie Detroit Rock City to rescue one of the four main characters out of Sunday school. The pizza is laced with 'Shrooms.
    • Eraser:
      • John Kruger is a top Witness Protection agent whose new assignment is to secure a witness in a high-profile case involving the sale of experimental weapons to Russian terrorists. The witness refuses to abandon her life, although she promises to testify. Kruger "borrows" a balloon delivery van and pretends to be a deliveryman partly in order to obscure his identity (she has already met him) and to use the balloons to block the view of any potential sniper. This works, temporarily. Unfortunately, the sniper is using one of the experimental weapons (a railgun with an X-ray scope), but Kruger is able to get close enough to the witness to protect her. Her Jerkass ex-boyfriend isn't so lucky, though.
      • A more straight example later, when a friend of Kruger's tries the traditional "pizza delivery" trick. However, they know that it won't work and the goal is to distract the security and have the guy take some pills that cause foam to come out of his mouth. He's taken to the company's medical room. Meanwhile, Kruger and the witness pretend to be paramedics and use the opportunity to sneak in this way.
      • Later we see a scientist eating a piece of pizza, suggesting that Bruce simply bribed each person who tried to stop him with a pizza.
      • In the Alex Rider novel Scorpia, Alex uses this trick to infiltrate a safehouse, hiding an explosive inside a large cola bottle. He "forgets" it while going through the checkpoint and the guard hands it over without taking it under the metal detector.
      • In Lawrence Block's The Burglar Who Painted Like Mondrian Bernie pretends to deliver flowers to a resident of the Charlemagne in order to get past security. He ends up doing it again when he can't come up with a good enough excuse to stay until the elevator operator's gone during his first attempt.
      • Discworld: In Moving Pictures Victor gets into Century of the Fruitbat Productions by pretending to be delivering a message, observing "No one with their sleeves rolled up who walks purposefully with a piece of paper held conspicuously in their hand is ever challenged."
      • In The Dresden Files, Harry Dresden once got into a dead guy's apartment by dressing up as a flower delivery guy. He almost got away with it.
      • Variant: In the final story of a Shadowrun anthology, attacks by street gangs leave Wolf and a woman he's escorting without transportation. They enter an all-night pizza shop to catch their breath, and Wolf has a quick word with the employees. Next scene, they're arriving safely at their destination, where Wolf hands over both the woman and some pizzas from the delivery van he'd bribed the shop's staff into lending them.
      • A Song of Ice and Fire: In A Storm of Swords, the Hound pretends to be delivering vegetables and a horse to get into the Twins. The horse comes in handy for distracting the attention of a nobleman who's encountered the Hound before.
      • Arrow. In "Darkness on the Edge of Town", Team Arrow sneak Felicity Smoak into the building owned by Malcom Merlyn so she can access the mainframe by disguising her as a delivery girl. Unfortunately she gets caught in a restricted area, but Diggle (working on site security) turns up, thanks the guard for catching her and removes her from the building, claiming she's a Stalker with a Crush chasing Merlyn's playboy son.
      • On an early episode of The A-Team, the team gets captured by Col. Lynch. Murdock gets onto the military base the team is held at by stealing a truck and posing as a delivery guy for a bakery. He even tells Amy, "Security is always weakest through the kitchen."
      • Banacek: In "If Max Is So Smart, Why Doesn't He Tell Us Where He Is?", various flunkies are preventing Banacek from getting into a hospital room to talk to the owner of the stolen supercomputer. Banacek dons a white coat, picks up two bunches of flowers and waltzes into her room unnoticed. Bonus points for him proceeding to arrange the flowers in a vase while conducting his interrogation.
      • Boardwalk Empire. In "You'd Be Surprised", a young Bugsy Siegel gets past Gyp Rosetti's guards by posing as the paperboy, pretending the original paperboy is ill. When fleeing the scene afterwards he runs into the real paperboy, and shoots him to death.
      • The Boys (2019). Hughie Campbell and Mother's Milk gain access to Popclaw's apartment by posing as technicians the landlord has contracted to install a new router. It helps that Hughie used to work in an AV store, so can pull off the role convincingly.
      • The Brady Bunch: Marcia & Greg sneak into Davy Jones' hotel room pretending to be bellhops delivering lunch.
      • Burn Notice
        • In one episode, Jesse pretends to be a delivery guy in order to gain access to the security room of a bank. At the same time, Madeline, who's just opened a new account, goes into the vault to access a safety deposit box and lights up a cigarette, setting off the alarm. The whole point of the ploy was for Jesse to be in the security room to see how the security team reacted to situation, since he was planning to rob the bank later and needed to know how quick they would react to a break-in.
        • In an earlier episode, Michael points out that a common way for spies to break into a place is as a delivery man. As a result, most real spies know to be suspicious of delivery people. Cue the bad guys grabbing the completely innocent delivery man Michael sent.
        • A bad guy does this with a pizza box that actually has a bomb, which goes off in the squad room. Fortunately, nobody is seriously injured.
        • Another episode had a victim's brother using a flower delivery to get into Casey Novak's office to beat her up (since she was the one who'd convinced his sister to come forward about her sexual assault, he felt she was the one who'd brought shame to his family. Somehow). The floral arrangement he carried had the added bonus of covering his face from the cameras.
        • And another has the detectives realizing that a killer did the same thing&mdashafter knocking out the friend who was showing up with champagne and flowers&mdashto gain access to a dinner party and rape and kill everyone.
        • On Seinfeld, Jerry is perplexed when his apartment is buzzed and the personal identifies themselves as "Federal Express", as he didn't order anything. Kramer is immediately convinced that the person is posing as a delivery man in order to get into the building and rob or kill someone. note Which HAS happened in Real Life, unfortunately. Luckily, this turns out to be a benign example of this trope&mdashit's Elaine, back from her European vacation (and the actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus, back from her maternity leave), resulting in a genuinely enthusiastic several minutes while she and the guys scream and laugh and hug each other.
        • Soap: Sally has ruined Burt's marriage by telling his wife that he'd been sleeping with her and an 18 year old. Burt goes to Sally's apartment and rings the bell, when she asks who it is he calls out in a not-very-convincing fake voice, "United Parcel".
        • In Spaced, Tim uses an actual delivery man to distract the security guard so that he can sneak into the offices of Dark Star Comics to retrieve an insulting image he drew of the man about to view his portfolio.
        • In an episode of The Suite Life on Deck, London does this in an attempt to thwart Zack, Cody, Bailey, Marcus, and Kirby's standoff for the whales in the engine room. Marcus was the only one fooled.
        • Gwen attempts this to enter Torchwood in the Torchwood episode "Everything Changes". Subverted in that the only reason she was let in was because they wanted her to get in. Anyone else delivering a pizza (for real or not) would not have gotten in past the first room.
          • Played straight in Torchwood: Miracle Day. Oswald Danes infiltrates Gwen's house by posing as a delivery man from a local grocery store. The real delivery man is briefly shown tied up and gagged in the back of his van, divested of his uniform and hat.
          • The Coup's "Pizza Man Skit" from Steal This Album features a repo man who gets in an old lady's house this way, and then takes her TV away. Followed by the song "The Repo Man Sings for You".
          • Played for Laughs in BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger, where Ragna calls out that he's delivering pizza. The funny comes from the fact that [A] all the guards are gone (likely liquidated to fuel Nu's smelting) and [B] he first said that he's come to kill them all.
          • Dragon Age: Origins has this. Depending on which party members are chosen for the infiltration, they might pretend to be priests or circus performers, but the default is to be delivering rather odd things such as "items of a personal nature" or "several hundred lovely knitted. scarves".
          • A possible tactic in many levels of the Hitman series. In particular, Agent 47 can disguise himself as a flower delivery guy and infiltrate a target's mansion in Hitman (2016).
          • The Longest Journey Saga:
            • In The Longest Journey April breaks into the Vanguard headquarters by pretending to deliver pizza.
            • In Dreamfall, she breaks into Friar's Keep by pretending to deliver a sandwich.
            • Done as part of Roast Beef's hack of Yahoo! Personals in Achewood.
            • The only reason Arianna kidnapped Vector , thus starting the plot of Castoff is an attempt to do this and steal some magical thing from the town citadel.
            • Virus and Rogue tried this one in Exterminatus Now. It almost works until Eastwood blows it by refusing to take part in such an obvious ploy.
            • In one Nukees strip, Gav claims he can break into a military base using a piece of cardboard. The piece of cardboard is placed on the roof of his car with the words "Gav's Pizza" written on it. It works.
            • In Episode 133 of Secret Of Mana Theatre, Fawn and Seth use this ploy to sneak into Elinee's castle. At first the guards refuse to let them in until told the flowers being delivered are from them.
            • Played for laughs in the TransformersAlternate Reality Game, where a pizza delivery man breached the facility due to a door being left open and nearly getting to where Megatron was stored.
            • In All Hail King Julien, our heroes need to get into a super villain's locked and guarded lair, so Julien knocks on the door claiming to have a special delivery. The guard refuses to open citing specific instructions not to open unless it's an emergency, so Julien claims it's an emergency and the guard opens the door.
            • The Joker uses a variation of the strategy in The Batman to kidnap Yin. He first slips a flyer for a pizza place under the door to her apartment (with a coupon) when she comes home from work, she's too tired to cook and decides to use it. She's suspicious when the operator says there's a "fifteen-seconds or it's free" offer, especially when it seems he actually gets there on time. Unfortunately, by then he has the jump on her.
            • In the Batman: The Animated Series episode "Make Em Laugh", The Joker kidnaps Lisa Lorraine this way. Lisa knows she didn't order pizza, but offers to buy it anyway, which is when the Joker opens the box, which contains knock-out gas.
            • In Batman Beyond, Terry pretends to be a pizza delivery boy in order to infiltrate Shreeve's laboratory. Although Shreeve is initially suspicious - the classic "I didn't order any pizza," - Terry manages to smooth it over by pretending that he got the address wrong and now the price of the pizza has to come out of his own paycheck, appealing to Shreeve's sympathy (Shreeve is desperate for funding for his work and can understand a minor act of rebellion against an unsympathetic corporate overseer) and offering to split the extra-large pie. They manage to have a very cordial conversation for a while over the pizza, until Terry pushes his luck with one too many probing questions about Shreeve's technology and rouses his suspicions again.
            • In Courage the Cowardly Dog, Courage uses this trick to get in a villain's lair, convincing Eustace to act as the delivery man while he hides in the pizza box. The villain is smart enough to know he didn't order pizza, but his dimwitted assistant who answers the door does not. Eustace doesn't know what's going on, but he doesn't complain as he says, it'd the easiest twenty bucks he's ever made.
            • Darkwing Duck once tried to infiltrate the Fearsome Five's headquarters by pretending to be a flower delivery guy. Of course Negaduck hates flowers, so DW had to backpedal and change it to delivering skulls.
            • In an episode of DuckTales (1987), when Launchpad finds out the entrance to the villain's lair is trough a deli, he tries to get in by disguising himself as a bread delivery man but the clerk isn't expecting bread. Launchpad finds out he is expecting a delivery of pickles, but when he comes back to try that, he's interrupted by the real pickle delivery man. Not willing to give up, he manages to get in by hiding in one of the guy's pickle barrels which works for a while, until the smell of pickles gives him away.
            • A cutaway gag on Family Guy which lampsahded several heist movie tropes featured a "super gymnastic Asian Peter" being delivered to a house.
            • In Futurama, the prank delivery that gets Fry frozen was planned out by Nibbler .
            • In the two-part House of Mouse short "Mickey Foils the Phantom Blot", Donald and Goofy disguise themselves as delivery men (wearing only fake mustaches) to distract the Phantom Blot by having him his name on clipboards, while Mickey (who was hiding in their cardboard box) sneaks past him to obtain Professor Von Drake's unlimited credit card, which the Blot stole.
            • King of the Hill:
              • In one episode, Dale enters Bill's army base as an exterminator, then dresses as an officer, then back to an exterminator in order to check on Bill's medical records.
              • Stood on its head in another episode: in order to rescue his friends from a Right-Wing Militia Fanatic named "Mad Dog", Dale orders a large number of flower bouquets to be delivered to Mad Dog's address. Mad Dog sees the delivery people carrying long, rectangular boxes just the right size to hide machine guns, assumes the FBI has finally caught up with him and is trying to pull this trick, and runs away.
              • In one episode, Shredder uses this trope as the basis of the plot. In a rare case of savviness, Shredder opens a pizza joint that specializes in weird pizzas, planning to stay in business until he gets an order for a pizza that only a mutant turtle could love. Then, he would follow the pizza to the Turtles' lair through a tracking device. The plan falls apart when he a) hires a disguised Michelangelo, and b) the Rat King steals the tracking pizza.
              • The Turtles themselves do it in another episode to infiltrate the warehouse where Shredder is holding April hostage. Shredder knows he didn't order pizza, but Rocksteady and Bebop are more gullible.
              • Mike Meyers note not the actor claims to have pulled something like this off in his A+ Certification textbook's chapter on computer security. A friend of his in another firm asked him to help test his fancy new firewall, so our intrepid author dug out an old jumpsuit and ID badge, bluffed his way past the receptionist and walked out the door with the unplugged server on a parcel trolley.
              • Terry Sweeney (a former writer and cast member of Saturday Night Live note notable for being the first and, so far, only one to be an openly gay man ) actually posed as a sandwich delivery man (complete with buying the sandwiches out of pocket) in order to get Jean Doumanian (who was setting up her now ill-fated era of SNL in 1980) to hire him as a show writer.
              • This dude managed to get into the Lollapalooza music festival two years in a row. The first year he posed as an ice delivery person. The second year he used a Clipboard of Authority. No word on what he's going to try in 2016.

              Video Example(s):


              Cornell Architecture Myths: Busted

              Where can you find the tomb of a secret society built into the side of a cliff, a building with no doors or windows and a secret research laboratory beneath a waterfall? No, it isn’t Hogwarts, it’s here in Ithaca on your way to class, by the road on your way home. Cornell’s campus has more secrets than a Dan Brown book: a closer look at some of the mysterious architecture around Ithaca reveals that the glossy brochure pictures of the Arts Quad are just the tip of a strange, strange iceberg. Some legends remain mysteries (catacombs beneath Sage Chapel, a secret exit from Uris) while others have been confirmed — you can walk through a tunnel between Olin and Uris on Slope Day, and the Cornell Synchotron accelerates particles under your feet while you run at Barton Hall. Others are revealed today: The Cornell Daily Sun, Mythbusters-style, explores the architectural archives on buildings kept under lock and key.

              900 Stewart Ave.
              Just past the Stewart Avenue bridge, at Fall Creek Road, there is a mysterious structure on the edge of the gorge. It looks like a bunker: a plain white wall with only the number 900 on it. It was, as many know, the home of Cornell’s late great Carl Sagan — an astronomer, popular writer and C.U. professor. Less known, however, is the fact that Sagan’s house has a history as dark and strange as the scientific mysteries that he popularized. Seen on YouTube from the roof of a building across the gorge, the building appears to not be a house at all, but an Egyptian shrine. Let’s take it back in time:
              It’s 1954. You’re an Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity brother, out with your buddies, drinking lemonade and having a good time. You’re headed for some good natured fun: you’re planning to prank one of the campus secret societies, Sphinx Head. You arrive at Stewart Avenue bridge, and suddenly you’re there: you stand on the edge of a cliff, facing what looks like an ancient Egyptian gateway. You take out the big padlock that you’ve brought with you, and laughing and scared, you lock the door shut from the outside, to the ignorance of the initiates within.
              The next day, The Cornell Daily Sun prints a note on how “Members of the Sphinx Head, senior men’s honorary, found themselves for a moment inescapably entombed when an outsider placed a padlock on the outside of their ‘tomb.’” Ron Demer ’59, the SAE brother who claims credit, puts the clipping in the archives for future generations (discovered by Cornell history buff Corey Earle ’07). Fifty years later, 900 Stewart Ave. is rarely noticed.
              Carl Sagan’s house was built as a tomb-cum-secret meeting place for Sphinx Head in 1925. The Architectural Digest ran a story in ’94 detailing the origins of Sagan’s house after it was renovated by the architectural firm Jullian and Pendleton. Sphinx Head, while they owned the building, conducted “initiation rites inside the tomb, in a large room where flickering six-foot candelabras cast shadows on unadorned walls before a ceremonial alter,” The Sun reported in 1979. The Sphinx Head eventually lost ownership of the building during a period of financial difficulty (including a tussle with competing senior honor society Quill and Dagger for ownership rights — “A bit of friendly rivalry,” said Earle ’07, former president of Q&D). It was converted into a home by Steven Mensch ’65 in the early ’80s and is now rumored to have been put up for sale again by Sagan’s wife. Inquire at your own risk.

              Alpha Delta Phi’s “The G”
              For a building with no doors or windows, Alpha Delta Phi’s Goat House — lovingly nicknamed “The G” by the brothers — has garnered intense amounts of speculation. Perhaps it is the way in which the building and its contents are kept in such in extreme secrecy that provokes the rumor mill. Everything that ever happened in Animal House, and so much more, has been rumored to take place within this conical-roofed, star shaped building. For all of the individuals who claim that they are sure they know all about it (“No, I am telling you, girls have sex in there a lot,” said an anonymous student), the brothers maintain to this day that only those initiated into the fraternity have ever been allowed in. “Someone tried to get in over winter break,” Jerome Soustra ’10, Alpha Delt brother shares, “we found crow bar marks.”
              Nonetheless, this strange building has an architectural history that may rival tales of farm animals, an S&M dungeon and a torture chamber for pledges. The original Alpha Delta Phi mansion and the current Goat House building were built in the spring of 1900 the main house was destroyed in a fire in 1929, though the Goat House survived (no doubt because of walls thick enough to stop a missile). The architect of the building was George R. Dean, who built the original building in the “prairie style” distinctive of iconic architect Frank Lloyd Wright (“Falling Water”). Further research finds that Dean, beyond simply being influenced by Wright, was his colleague and peer. The Goat House is ultimately Cornell’s last remnant of an architect who collaborated with America’s early architectural pioneers.
              The Goat House also stands as a rival to the Nott Memorial at Union College whose students claim that it is the only 16-sided building in the northern hemisphere. Though the brothers of Alpha Delt will famously tell you nothing about the inside of the building, Soustra shared a strange story about the place. “Recently a brother ordered a pizza to the house. When the delivery guy called, he came up from a manhole in the hill [leading to the Goat House] while it was dark out, took the pizza, and went back in. The pizza dude was freaking out!” Soustra recalls. No doubt. The existence of manholes around the Goat House remains to be confirmed until after the snow melts.

              Beebe Lake Ruin
              Many freshmen have the experience of looking off of Thurston Bridge and seeing a strange ruin built into the base of Beebe Lake. On the way back, now intoxicated from their forays in Collegetown and West Campus, freshmen wonder among themselves, what could it be? A prison? A factory? An abandoned UFO? Reform school for too rowdy Chem-Es? The seemingly fictional Milstein Hall? This building has stymied generations of would-be adventurers and explorers. Risley inhabitants climb down the other side of the gorge and try to access the building from the bottom levels. A current anonymous architecture professor who attended Cornell in the ’70s recalls attempts to climb down from the now gated structure above the dam.
              The ruin, ultimately, is not a prison or any other facility of dubious origin. Leo Hovi, now 77 years old, worked as an engineer for American Electrical Power in 1955, when the company used the facility for researchwith permission from the University.
              “AEP had a huge problem at one of their plants,” said Hovi, “In the spring, a large number of leaves coming down the river would cause the plant to shut down, since the plant used river water to condense the steam. The company decided to design something to stop these leaves from entering the water system.” He reveals that the ruin at the bottom of Beebe Dam was a half-century old stab at solving problems with alternate energy. “They wanted a study made of the design to satisfy themselves that this would work. That’s what [the ruin] is: a hydraulics lab.” The lab allowed full-scale investigations in the power of running water. Hovi recalls that when the laboratory was up and running, it was fully accessible by car.
              According The New York Times, the now abandoned hydraulics lab was built in 1898 “to foster the progress of hydraulic science” at the cost of $15,000 — almost $2 million today based on GDP per capita. It was built in a 12th-century Florentine style with local stone intended to match the cliff face. The lab could handle 3,000 cubic feet of water from Beebe Lake Dam used to conduct a variety of experiments, including scale models of ships in turbulent water. The Times reported that the lab was abandoned in the late 1960s because of damages from a flood.

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              Exclusive: Leader Of Dylann Roof-Worshipping Neo-Nazi Group Exposed

              A prominent white supremacist who encourages acts of domestic terror and who once claimed to have influenced the Pittsburgh synagogue shooter is a 27-year-old restaurant worker in California, a new HuffPost investigation has confirmed.

              For years, a man using the pseudonym “Vic Mackey” has been the leading voice in a confederation of neo-Nazis called the “ Bowl Patrol ,” a reference to white supremacist murderer Dylann Roof’s “bowl cut” hairstyle.

              In podcasts, videos and social media posts reviewed by HuffPost, Mackey has called on his followers — including nearly 1,000 on Telegram — to commit hate crimes, threatened activists and journalists with rape and violence and celebrated white nationalist massacres — in Christchurch, New Zealand El Paso, Texas Poway, California, and elsewhere — all while keeping his real identity secret.

              Though it’s hard to know the exact number of people Mackey has influenced, the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League see him as a leader in this network of extremists, some of whom have been arrested in connection with threats or plans of real-world violence in Roof’s name .

              Even as so many other white nationalists have been unmasked in recent years — among them cops , soldiers and politicians — Mackey has remained elusive. But in recent weeks, the Anonymous Comrades Collective , a group of anti-fascist researchers, has traced Mackey’s online history and believes he is a man named Andrew Richard Casarez, a 27-year-old pizza delivery driver who lives in a Sacramento suburb.

              HuffPost has also confirmed his identity via photos, videos and audio clips, and by speaking to people who have known Casarez over the years.

              Casarez did not respond to multiple requests for comment on this story.

              His unmasking comes at a time when there has been a growing threat of violent right-wing extremism in the United States. A recent report from the Center For Strategic and International Studies found that from 1994 to 2020, there were nearly 900 terrorist attacks and plots in the country, nearly 60% of which were carried out by right-wing extremists. In 2019, domestic extremists killed at least 42 people in the United States, making 2019 the sixth-deadliest year on record for domestic extremist-related killings since 1970, according to a February report put out by the ADL Center on Extremism.

              With the white supremacist rhetoric of President Donald Trump and his Fox News bullhorn , the growing economic instability caused by the coronavirus pandemic and the heightened political tensions surrounding this year’s presidential election, violent extremism is expected to grow, according to CSIS.

              Already, six alleged members of neo-Nazi group The Base were arrested in January after police discovered plans to foment violence at a Virginia gun rights rally and to target an anti-fascist couple in Georgia. And five suspected members ― including two alleged leaders ― of the violent neo-Nazi group Atomwaffen Division were arrested in February after being accused of targeting journalists by calling police to their homes and dropping off threatening fliers.

              Earlier this year, the FBI elevated the threat of racist extremism to a “national threat priority” for the fiscal year 2020. FBI Director Christopher Wray told the House Judiciary Committee that the new distinction has put white supremacist violence on the “same footing as ISIS and homegrown violent extremists.”

              Making Mass Shooters Into ‘Saints’

              Dylann Roof stared blankly ahead during his first court appearance days after he gunned down nine Black parishioners in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015, HuffPost reported from the courthouse at the time. Roof was flanked by two guards in a remote room with a video screen connecting him to the rest of the court. Roof stood silent as families of the victims were given the opportunity to speak.

              Nadine Collier, daughter of victim Ethel Lance, said she forgave Roof. Alana Simmons, granddaughter of victim Daniel Simmons, reminded Roof he had failed.

              “Hate won’t win,” she told him. “My grandfather and the other victims died at the hands of hate. Everyone’s plea for your soul is proof that they lived in love and their legacies live in love.”

              On the other side of the country, Andrew Casarez was developing an obsession with Roof. Then 22, Casarez was living at home with his parents after a stint in college. A couple of years before, he was on probation for a DUI, public records show. As the years went on, Casarez would become entrenched in his worship of a murderer, working to build a base of like-minded racists who shared his dangerous ideology.

              On Discord, a chat app popular among gamers but also frequently co-opted by right-wing extremists, a group emerged called “Bowl Patrol.” Though the exact date the group formed is unclear, members were posting as early as 2017, before that year’s deadly “Unite The Right” white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, according to leaked chat logs obtained by independent media collective Unicorn Riot .

              Many members called for lynchings and used racial slurs. Another member photoshopped an image of himself smiling while standing in front of a pile of dead bodies at a Nazi death camp during the Holocaust. And yet another, who described himself as the founder of the “Bowl Patrol,” described how the group’s memes would help condition people to carry out mass shootings.

              “How are they gonna handle stomping a niglet’s head like a grape gusher if a meme is too much for them?” he wrote in one post.

              This member’s username was “Vic Mackey,” a name borrowed from the racist, corrupt cop character on the TV show “The Shield.” He fashioned himself the leader of the Bowl Patrol, giving himself the nickname “Head Bowl in Charge,” and transformed the group into a congregation for Dylann Roof worshippers.

              Eventually, Discord shut down the Bowl Patrol group, but Mackey and the other group members found homes elsewhere online, including on Gab and Telegram.

              Mackey and a few other members produced a podcast, too, called “Bowlcast.” In a December 2018 episode, less than two months after a white supremacist named Robert Bowers allegedly shot and killed 11 people inside the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, Mackey described how the attack had “totally reinvigorated” him.

              “The night before that wonderful thing happened, before Saint Bowers went to synagogue, me and some other bowls on bowl patrol were talking with each other and saying … It’s a shame that there hasn’t been a Saint Roof event, another ‘take me to church’ event, and that we’re really due for another one,” Mackey said.

              Mackey claimed Bowers had followed him on Gab and that the two had interacted. He also boasted that Bowers had posted memes created by the Bowl Patrol group.

              “Robert Bowers is not going to be the last, not by far, he’s not gonna be the last,” Mackey said. “There is going to be a million Bowers flowers blossoming.”

              In the year and a half since that episode, Mackey and Bowl Patrol members have “canonized” many more accused white nationalist mass shooters, often celebrating the lives of “Saint Crusius , ” “Saint Earnest ” and “Saint Tarrant .”

              “Vic Mackey’s biggest contribution to the white power movement has been to normalize violence and glorify acts of terrorism,” Cassie Miller, a senior research analyst at the Southern Poverty Law Center, told HuffPost recently.

              Mackey and the Bowl Patrol’s emergence, Miller argued, exemplifies how American white nationalists have increasingly come to embrace “accelerationism” — the idea that acts of violence are needed to hasten the collapse of society so that a fascist and whites-only state can be constructed in its place.

              In 2017, Miller said, prominent voices of the so-called alt-right, emboldened by the election of Donald Trump, were seeking to gain actual political power. New white nationalist groups like Identity Evropa came to prominence with the express intent of infiltrating the GOP. Fascist figureheads like Richard Spencer organized a series of high-profile rallies to promote their abominable ideas to the masses.

              But the Bowl Patrol largely saw these attempts at using mainstream political channels as futile. People like Mackey, Miller said, argued that there was no way white nationalists were going “to vote themselves to an ethno-state.”

              Instead, the Bowl Patrol promoted violence.

              In a November 2018 episode of “Bowlcast,” for example, Mackey implored his listeners to read a “certain monosyllabic book,” a reference to “Siege” by neo-Nazi James Mason , which explicitly advocates lone-wolf terror attacks as a way to begin a race war and promotes the extermination of all nonwhites.

              Thanks to anti-fascist activism, deplatforming by social media platforms and crackdowns by law enforcement, groups like Identity Evropa have fallen largely into disarray since the Charlottesville rally . Mackey and the Bowl Patrol seem vindicated by their failures and have continued to preach crass accelerationist sermons in podcasts and to post genocidal memes to Gab and Telegram.

              “All the members of the Bowl Patrol are emboldened by the fact that people don’t know who they are,” Miller said.

              Mackey, in particular, she added, “uses anonymity to his favor. And if his name and face are out there, he can’t do that anymore.”

              Unmasking Andrew Richard Casarez

              As Vic Mackey’s star rose in accelerationist circles, so too did the desire to uncover his real identity.

              Last year, Unicorn Riot posted thousands of leaked Discord chats from the Bowl Patrol group. Then, on July 7, the Anonymous Comrades Collective published a blog post identifying Mackey as Andrew Richard Casarez, 27, of Orangevale, California.

              HuffPost has since contacted multiple people who know Casarez and were able to identify him from his selfie and from audio clips of his podcast. For their protection, we are not publishing their names or any information that could be used to identify them. All fear the possibility of retribution.

              Public records show that Casarez is indeed 27 and lives in Orangevale, a wealthy and predominantly white suburb of Sacramento. He has worked multiple restaurant jobs in the area, including as a pizza delivery driver. He also appears to have once attended the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California .

              Calls and texts to phone numbers associated with Casarez have gone unanswered. Messages to the Vic Mackey account on Telegram, which has posted messages this month, also went unanswered.

              Asked if the FBI was aware of Mackey and the Bowl Patrol, a spokesperson for the agency told HuffPost in an email that “in keeping with DOJ policy, the FBI neither confirms nor denies the existence of investigations.”

              The spokesperson also emphasized that “when it comes to domestic terrorism, our investigations focus solely on criminal activity of individuals—regardless of group membership—which appears to be intended to intimidate or coerce the civilian population or influence the policy of the government by intimidation or coercion.”

              “The FBI does not and will not police ideology,” the spokesperson said. If that ideology evolves into real-world crimes, however, the FBI could investigate.

              Hometown Hate Crimes

              Back in his hometown of Orangevale, at least two places of worship have been targeted in hate crimes. In 2017, Temple Or Rishon, a synagogue, was covered with more than a dozen posters praising Adolf Hitler, white supremacist website the Daily Stormer and Dylann Roof. And earlier this year, a newly opened Sikh temple was vandalized with a spray-painted swastika and the words “white power.”

              Casarez seemed to relish the incident at Temple Or Rishon, posting an image from a surveillance video released by police that showed two white males with their faces covered approaching the synagogue. The photo had been edited to add bowl-style haircuts on the men.

              “What absolute monsters could have done such a thing?!” he wrote.

              On his podcast in 2019, Casarez mused about the best ways to strike terror into the Jewish community.

              “I just wanted to say really quickly that it’s amazing what a few pieces of paper taped up across the street from a synagogue can do,” he said.

              Casarez suggested wearing gloves when printing out the paper, and cautioned against using adhesive tape to put posters up because “it can remove paint, and they can consider it vandalism.” In the case of Temple Or Rishon, removing the posters also ripped the building’s paint off the walls, which gave investigators the property damage charge they needed to classify the vandalism as a hate crime.

              The Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department, which has handled both hate crime incidents, told HuffPost they are investigating Casarez and seized a firearm from his home earlier this month.

              In a Discord chat discussing the synagogue vandalism, Casarez promised: “Let’s just say there’s many more pranks to come.”

              Role-Playing Hatred To Strangers

              As the nation continues to reel from the killing of Black Minneapolis man George Floyd and other victims of police brutality, there have been waves of protests demanding accountability and an end to systemic racism. On June 3, thousands of people in San Francisco marched in a peaceful anti-racism demonstration.

              Almost exactly a year prior, on the evening of June 2, 2019, Casarez was on the streets of San Francisco, livestreaming himself antagonizing passersby. Posing as a “citizen journalist,” he approached several different people walking down the sidewalk, claiming he worked for Tucker Carlson of Fox News. Most didn’t stop to talk Casarez harangued them, calling out as they passed by that Trump had signed an executive order to free Dylann Roof. It was of course a lie, but he kept up his enthusiastic role-playing even as people largely ignored him.

              “So you’re not a fan of Dylann Roof, is what you’re saying?” he asked a man and woman walking together.

              “I don’t know who he is, and I don’t know who the fuck you are,” the man responded.

              Later, as a Black man who had ignored Casarez walked out of earshot, Casarez turned to his screen and said, “Talk about an Uncle Tom. He doesn’t even care about Dylann Roof being free and killing niggers.”

              Vic Mackey, the tough-guy persona that had inspired legions of white supremacists, was livestreaming his heroics. But in real life, Casarez was just alone on the street, talking to the glow of his screen.

              This story has been updated to include information on the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department investigation into Casarez.


              Richard gets his first job as a pizza delivery guy, but strange things begin to happen around Elmore as a result.

              Important details about the plot or story are up ahead

              The episode starts in the front lawn with an unconscious Nicole having a nightmare and being slapped awake by Anais. She fainted at the news of Richard getting a job as a pizza delivery guy. Nicole uneasily walks back to the house, assisted by Anais, uncertain about her husband's newfound profession. Before leaving, she instructs Gumball and Darwin to watch over Richard, to which they comply. The boys express their surprise at Richard getting a job. He had originally called a hotline to Fervidus Pizza, but the number was a job application. He explains his method of getting "free" pizza: slicing off the middle segment for himself and hiding any evidence. After drooling a bit, he drives off on his scooter like a madman, dropping several pizzas. Gumball and Darwin notice this, lending their assistance by delivering the dropped pizzas.

              Back in the house, Nicole is still taken aback by Richard gaining employment. Anais comforts her, saying that the additional income will be of tremendous help. She uses a family picture for reference, pointing out the fact that they have been wearing the same clothes for a year, Nicole, Richard, and Gumball lacking shoes, and Darwin's lack of pants. Nicole initially concedes but notices something wrong with the picture: a huge crack where her husband is pointing on the stone model of the earth, and his red eyes. As a premonition, ominous music plays in the background.

              In the meantime, Gumball and Darwin have arrived at the first house—438 Elm Street, home of two married pizzas, the Pepperonis. Their order is their "new baby," which Gumball presents to them. The couple gushes over the "new member of their family" while Quattro gives Gumball a $20 bill. Unfortunately, as Gumball reaches for the money, he drops the pizza to the ground. Gruesomely, it slithers down the steps, leaving behind a blood-red trail of pizza sauce. The Pepperonis are horrified, and a panicked Gumball drops the empty pizza box and hands them a different one, which the Pepperonis accept, still horrified. They slowly walk down the stairs, making their departure, but not before Darwin accidentally skids the pizza across the pavement.

              Richard, meanwhile, is singing a rap about his new job. He trips, and as he stumbles around on his vehicle, he leaves behind a trail of distorted reality.

              Gumball and Darwin have fled to their next destination, Mr. Small's house. Unfortunately, his order is the replacement given to the Pepperonis. Gumball improvises and crams a clump grass and dirt into a pizza shape, adding a piece of gum from off Mr. Small's doorstep and spreading it on the pizza. As Gumball finishes, a starved Mr. Small pops out, tearing into the pizza like a maniac immediately after explaining his new diet. After a few monstrous bites, he stops, twitches, and faints. He is still alive and well, denoted by the bubble of gum blown through his mouth. Darwin, relieved, asks him for payment.

              At the house, Nicole is filling a mug with tap water. Richard passes by the house, causing the water to defy gravity by floating up to the ceiling. Nicole panics and turns the water off as Anais walks in. Nicole tries to show Anais what had transpired, but with Richard long gone, the water is running normally. Anais decides to tease her mother, talking about how running water did not exist during her childhood. Nicole shrugs it off and solidifies her belief that Richard having a job is a bad thing, prompting Anais to take her coffee mug away. This small action causes Nicole to snap, exclaiming that she is not hysterical.

              The final pizza that Gumball and Darwin need to deliver is to the Bananas. Banana Bob answers the door and begins chanting "pizza" repeatedly. He is soon joined by his wife and son, as Gumball and Darwin uncomfortably watch. Then Richard zooms by, distorting reality once again by putting the family in a continuous loop. Gumball and Darwin, unaware of this, believes the Bananas are just crazy. Gumball teases them by asking questions where pizza is the answer. Their amusement worn thin, they leave the pizza in the house and close the door. Gumball takes one last peek at them through the mail slot and sees them still chanting but in slow motion. He dismisses it as the family's regular creepiness.

              Anais is trying to set Nicole at ease. She describes Richard working as a change in the balance of the universe and that of the authoritative power within the family, which upsets her. Gumball and Darwin enter the house and tell her that they delivered the pizzas to their houses and nothing went wrong. Nicole flips the TV on in time for a breaking news report illustrating many bizarre occurrences across Elmore. Nighttime has fallen early upon the Food 'n' Stuff store, there is snowfall elsewhere in Elmore, and Marvin is floating. Linking these events with her husband's employment, which she affirms as an anomaly along with other examples, Nicole sets off to have him fired.

              The family is driving with Richard's employer, Larry, who claims that tearing the fabric of the universe is not grounds for dismissal. They catch Richard in their sights, who speeds towards his destination and further distorts reality with repeated wrings on the throttle. His family gains on him, but Anais warns them to be more cautious. Richard pushes the throttle many times, altering the family and Larry in different ways. 

              They find Richard's destination through a beam of light vacuuming everything in sight. Their hurried pace saves them from a falling, hardened cloud. He rings the doorbell and the beam grows brighter. Nicole is turned into a puddle, and the children and Larry into many more variations of themselves, from the warped reality. Before accepting the pizza, the customer complains about its half-eaten appearance. Larry learns of Richard's crude method of obtaining "free" pizza and is given enough of an incentive to fire him, undoing the damage to the universe, restoring Elmore to normal, and turning Nicole back to her original body.

              Richard is stripped of his helmet, scooter, and job. The family comforts him over his termination, rekindling his drive to search for another and sending the fabric of reality hanging in the balance once more.


              Richard is left in charge for the day, but his lack of rules attracts unwanted guests to the Watterson house.

              Important details about the plot or story are up ahead

              One by one, Elmore citizens crash the Wattersons' house. The Wattersons realize they have gone too far, and they try to intervene. Gumball tries to tell people to get out. Unfortunately, the people do not want to give up their freedom, so they kick the Wattersons out of their house. The problem is, Richard cannot say "no." The kids attempt at intervention but fail repeatedly. They try to open the door with Richard's credit card, but a hobo takes the card from inside of the house and uses it to order many pizzas. They eventually manage to enter their home disguised as a pizza delivery man, with Richard hiding in a tall stack of pizza boxes. They crash the party going on in the house, and Richard, after a bit of effort, successfully utters "no" and commands the citizens to leave. However, he falters when they intimidate him, and the Wattersons are thrown out of their house again. They realize they are missing something, something which has the power to stop chaos inside their home. Right then, Nicole arrives home and effortlessly orders the citizens to clean up the huge mess and never come back, ending the episode.


              Richard gets his first job as a pizza delivery guy, but strange things begin to happen around Elmore as a result.

              Important details about the plot or story are up ahead

              The episode starts in the front lawn with an unconscious Nicole having a nightmare and being slapped awake by Anais. She fainted at the news of Richard getting a job as a pizza delivery guy. Nicole uneasily walks back to the house, assisted by Anais, uncertain about her husband's newfound profession. Before leaving, she instructs Gumball and Darwin to watch over Richard, to which they comply. The boys express their surprise at Richard getting a job. He had originally called a hotline to Fervidus Pizza, but the number was a job application. He explains his method of getting "free" pizza: slicing off the middle segment for himself and hiding any evidence. After drooling a bit, he drives off on his scooter like a madman, dropping several pizzas. Gumball and Darwin notice this, lending their assistance by delivering the dropped pizzas.

              Back in the house, Nicole is still taken aback by Richard gaining employment. Anais comforts her, saying that the additional income will be of tremendous help. She uses a family picture for reference, pointing out the fact that they have been wearing the same clothes for a year, Nicole, Richard, and Gumball lacking shoes, and Darwin's lack of pants. Nicole initially concedes but notices something wrong with the picture: a huge crack where her husband is pointing on the stone model of the earth, and his red eyes. As a premonition, ominous music plays in the background.

              In the meantime, Gumball and Darwin have arrived at the first house—438 Elm Street, home of two married pizzas, the Pepperonis. Their order is their "new baby," which Gumball presents to them. The couple gushes over the "new member of their family" while Quattro gives Gumball a $20 bill. Unfortunately, as Gumball reaches for the money, he drops the pizza to the ground. Gruesomely, it slithers down the steps, leaving behind a blood-red trail of pizza sauce. The Pepperonis are horrified, and a panicked Gumball drops the empty pizza box and hands them a different one, which the Pepperonis accept, still horrified. They slowly walk down the stairs, making their departure, but not before Darwin accidentally skids the pizza across the pavement.

              Richard, meanwhile, is singing a rap about his new job. He trips, and as he stumbles around on his vehicle, he leaves behind a trail of distorted reality.

              Gumball and Darwin have fled to their next destination, Mr. Small's house. Unfortunately, his order is the replacement given to the Pepperonis. Gumball improvises and crams a clump grass and dirt into a pizza shape, adding a piece of gum from off Mr. Small's doorstep and spreading it on the pizza. As Gumball finishes, a starved Mr. Small pops out, tearing into the pizza like a maniac immediately after explaining his new diet. After a few monstrous bites, he stops, twitches, and faints. He is still alive and well, denoted by the bubble of gum blown through his mouth. Darwin, relieved, asks him for payment.

              At the house, Nicole is filling a mug with tap water. Richard passes by the house, causing the water to defy gravity by floating up to the ceiling. Nicole panics and turns the water off as Anais walks in. Nicole tries to show Anais what had transpired, but with Richard long gone, the water is running normally. Anais decides to tease her mother, talking about how running water did not exist during her childhood. Nicole shrugs it off and solidifies her belief that Richard having a job is a bad thing, prompting Anais to take her coffee mug away. This small action causes Nicole to snap, exclaiming that she is not hysterical.

              The final pizza that Gumball and Darwin need to deliver is to the Bananas. Banana Bob answers the door and begins chanting "pizza" repeatedly. He is soon joined by his wife and son, as Gumball and Darwin uncomfortably watch. Then Richard zooms by, distorting reality once again by putting the family in a continuous loop. Gumball and Darwin, unaware of this, believes the Bananas are just crazy. Gumball teases them by asking questions where pizza is the answer. Their amusement worn thin, they leave the pizza in the house and close the door. Gumball takes one last peek at them through the mail slot and sees them still chanting but in slow motion. He dismisses it as the family's regular creepiness.

              Anais is trying to set Nicole at ease. She describes Richard working as a change in the balance of the universe and that of the authoritative power within the family, which upsets her. Gumball and Darwin enter the house and tell her that they delivered the pizzas to their houses and nothing went wrong. Nicole flips the TV on in time for a breaking news report illustrating many bizarre occurrences across Elmore. Nighttime has fallen early upon the Food 'n' Stuff store, there is snowfall elsewhere in Elmore, and Marvin is floating. Linking these events with her husband's employment, which she affirms as an anomaly along with other examples, Nicole sets off to have him fired.

              The family is driving with Richard's employer, Larry, who claims that tearing the fabric of the universe is not grounds for dismissal. They catch Richard in their sights, who speeds towards his destination and further distorts reality with repeated wrings on the throttle. His family gains on him, but Anais warns them to be more cautious. Richard pushes the throttle many times, altering the family and Larry in different ways. 

              They find Richard's destination through a beam of light vacuuming everything in sight. Their hurried pace saves them from a falling, hardened cloud. He rings the doorbell and the beam grows brighter. Nicole is turned into a puddle, and the children and Larry into many more variations of themselves, from the warped reality. Before accepting the pizza, the customer complains about its half-eaten appearance. Larry learns of Richard's crude method of obtaining "free" pizza and is given enough of an incentive to fire him, undoing the damage to the universe, restoring Elmore to normal, and turning Nicole back to her original body.

              Richard is stripped of his helmet, scooter, and job. The family comforts him over his termination, rekindling his drive to search for another and sending the fabric of reality hanging in the balance once more.


              The Wattersons must survive a bizarre game of Dodj or Daar through to the end.

              Important details about the plot or story are up ahead

              Rushing outside to the trash can, they discover that it has been emptied out. They run back into the house to see Anais, Nicole, and Richard playing it. Richard is about to throw the dice. They yell "DON'T THROW THE DICE!" and dive towards them in slow motion, but it is too late.

              Gumball and Darwin then explain the very real danger that the game poses to their family, but at first, their warnings are not heeded. When the "dodj"s start bending reality, Nicole packs up the game, convinced that the effects are merely just part of their imagination and will wear off, despite Gumball explaining to them that the effects will only stop when they finish the game.

              The game continues to plague them and gets them into undesirable situations. Anais cannot get off the couch (due to the floor being lava to her), Gumball gets detention (due to singing at the wrong time), Nicole ends up missing a client (due to screaming at her doubt), Richard damages the shed (mangling his face in the process), and Darwin gets signed up for a few very undesirable activities (due to having his arm synced with Richard's).

              They all rush home in order to complete their game. Gumball then states that the fastest way to finish is if they all complete their "daar"s. Contrary to this, however, Gumball ends up taking a dodj card. They end up getting a "dodj bomb," and with the dodjs getting even worse, they struggle to complete the game, which will be accomplished when somebody rolls an exact number to land on the ending space.

              After Anais is temporarily frozen, Richard is lethargized, Gumball is in a personal earthquake, Nicole gets huge hands, and Darwin isn't affected (being an "inverted mermaid" already), Nicole ends up drawing a card that does not allow anybody to breathe until the game is over. They nearly suffocate as Gumball throws the dice, pleading for a "six." The dice lands, displaying a three. Nicole, in frustration and anger, slams the ground with the large hands she was afflicted with earlier, shaking the dice, achieving the six they all needed. Everything returns to normal, as Gumball states, but the Wattersons soon discover that all the damage that was caused remained. The Wattersons' house lies in ruins, complete with a light post that has crashed through the roof.


              The Sucker

              Darwin ends up in detention with Julius, who decides to make Darwin his new target. However, it backfires when Darwin ruins his life.

              Important details about the plot or story are up ahead

              Darwin begins to question what happens in detention, to which Julius proclaims that he desired to commit violent acts against other students however, as a result of Darwin's naivety, he misunderstands Julius' words and thinks he is referring to random, positive aspects of life.

              Julius acknowledges these misinterpretations to conclude that Darwin is so naive that he would be easy to manipulate, which is only confirmed when Darwin states that he would do whatever Julius wants— once again, out of pure naivety. Pleased with this response, Julius calls someone and says that he finally "got one" and states that he is so perfect, they could get away with anything as Darwin holds the phone for the student. 

              Later, Darwin stands in an alleyway— after Julius and Darwin presumably escaped detention— being overshadowed by delinquents that are friends with Julius. Despite their threatening appearances, Darwin remarks that they are quite friendly - a little too friendly. The delinquents introduce themselves as Reaper, Scythe, and Mowdown Darwin once again misunderstands the context of the situation and assumes that they are from families specializing in agriculture in order to receive such nicknames, rather than having nicknames that hint towards something more sinister. Julius and his gang acknowledge Darwin's naivety to be perfect for the gang. Darwin then asks if they have a secret handshake and offers to give the gang one, but only further confirms that Darwin is so foolish that he gets accepted into the gang on the spot. Julius' first command for the fish is to steal everything from Alison's purse, which Darwin accepts. 

              As a result of the command to clean out the woman's purse, Darwin appears to be on a good start in the gang's viewpoint by dumping out the contents of the purse, but things take a turn when Darwin uses a compact vacuum to literally clean out the purse, and then places the woman's belongings back in it. When he grabs the wallet, Julius shakes his head, trying to convey that he has misunderstood what he had wanted. It is here that Julius signals that he wants money, and once again Darwin is shown to understand by pulling out money, but blows dust off of the bill and places the dollar back into the wallet and sets it back in the purse, and to put icing on the cake, he even attaches a pine tree-shaped air freshener, much to Julius' chagrin. 

              Upon Darwin's return, Julius quickly recovers from the failure and tells Darwin to order $1,000 of pizza to the police precinct, to which the youngster accepts. Larry delivers a massive pile of pizza boxes to the police precinct as Julius, Darwin, and the rest of the delinquents eavesdrop from a nearby bush in front of the establishment. Things go according to plan however, the Donut Cop waves in a friendly manner towards the group, much to Julius' surprise. Here, it is revealed that Darwin was questioned by the person taking the order as to who it was from, to which Darwin said it was from Julius on top of that, they already had the delinquent's credit card details which means instead of this being a prank, it was an unintentional act of generosity. The Doughnut Sheriff walks up to the group and expresses gratitude for the pizzas however, in order to not make it look like bribery, he is pressured to write a ticket for the group for loitering. 

              At a car garage, Julius begs the group for one last chance to prove that Darwin is a worthy member of their group. Julius' next order for Darwin is to cover a van in dirt, and the youngster agrees to this and throws mud on the van however, Mr. Small approaches his van and, pleased with the muddy statues that have formed on the van, pays Darwin $5 for the good deed. Darwin comes back to the group, who are now appalled by what just transpired. Darwin then states that the money goes to the boss, and so Julius takes it however, this only causes a fight between the members as to who should be the boss. Darwin attempts to diffuse the fight with a musical number however, Mowdown cuts off his song angrily and declares that he, Reaper, and Scythe are not friends with Julius after calling him unworthy of being their leader and after multiple failed attempts to get Darwin to do one bad thing. 

              As Darwin laments over his failed musical number, Julius plots to get back at the delinquents by proving he can get Darwin to do anything and gives Darwin a figurative way of saying they are leaving however, Darwin once again proves his naivety by taking it out of context. Fed up with Darwin's antics, he grabs him and drags him offscreen. 

              At Elmore Junior High, Julius and Darwin come to a building that contains the public swimming pool. The plan is to pour the detergent in the swimming pool, and finally Darwin's sense of a moral compass shines through minimally when he mentions that trespassing is wrong and states (wrongfully) that it is one of the Seven Deadly Sins. Julius cuts him off when he says that it is not wrong if it is for a good cause, in this case the "good cause" is that every child has a right to access clean water. Darwin agrees to this, proving that he is once again able to be manipulated. After asking about how to get through the door, Darwin rams into it (after being told to use his head), but this fails. Julius hands him his credit card and Darwin drops it in the mail slot to supposedly pay for the damage done to the door, but the delinquent angrily states that it was to gain access to the interior. 

              In an attempt to get his credit card back, they go towards a door and Julius lifts it partially up, ordering Darwin to drop and roll however, upon opening the door, Darwin drops and rolls past Julius when he was supposed to go inside to get the card back. Out of rage, Julius accidentally drops the door on his foot and becomes injured. Darwin asks for his phone and calls for medical help, but accidentally gives away Julius' intentions. Out of fear, Darwin cancels the call and smashes the phone so the call cannot be traced. Darwin helps Julius get his foot free, to his success, and the delinquent attempts to physically attack the youngster in retaliation, but only hurts himself further.

              Police sirens can be heard and Darwin helps Julius walk to a hiding spot, but upon being unable to see one, Darwin suggests kissing one another to hide each other's faces, but Julius backs away from the child and falls down a small flight of stairs into a dark, abandoned building. The camera cuts to an open environment where Darwin helps Julius walk and they take a break at a tree. Stating that he cannot walk any further, he orders Darwin to steal a bike. Darwin's normal self comes through again when he becomes skeptical of that order, but Julius is quick to reassure him that if they did one bad thing then, they would do two good things later in compensation. 

              Darwin runs off and gets in the way of a bike rider, causing her to become flustered and wreck. Julius is quick to scold Darwin for this since the bike rider was Debbie, his girlfriend. Darwin once again suggests that they kiss in order to hide their faces and the delinquent tries to fend him off, but upon recovering, Debbie gets the wrong idea and breaks up with him, leaving him devastated that his life turned for the worst in just a span of a day since he lost his girlfriend, his friends, is at risk of being arrested, and being a disappointment to his parents. Darwin states that Julius is not making any sense, remarking that if he lived in a world just as Julius said— which was filled with "kittens and rainbows"— that the kittens would have nothing to eat. Amidst hopelessness, Julius sends away Darwin, much to the latter's sadness. 

              Darwin snaps out of his sadness to proclaim that he will fix everything that he is done and asks of Julius to meet him at a bus stop. Later that evening, Darwin is dropped off at the same bus stop Julius is waiting for him at and states that he has fixed everything. 

              Darwin begins to explain that he reunited the gang after they supposedly declared war on a biker gang, then goes on to say that he patched things up with Debbie and says that she and Julius will be married that weekend however, Darwin is the one kneeling before her and holding the ring, so Debbie and everyone else think that Darwin is the one proposing for her, rather than proposing for Julius in his absence. Darwin then says that he even took care of the police problem by saying it was Julius' father being the one who broke into the public pool. Upon lamenting over how his mother will be angry, Darwin says that she will never find out since she is being deported to an unspecified country. 

              Julius is in shock to hear all of these things, but Darwin reassures him that it was a joke, although he did patch things up with his crew and his girlfriend to get the bully to learn an important lesson. This confirms that Darwin was putting up a facade the entire time to prove a point. 

              Julius then says that he should bully more people in order to supposedly learn more life lessons, much to Darwin's fright. Darwin is about to scold Julius, but Julius makes the same facial expression to signal that what he said was a joke. Julius then apologizes to the youngster for bullying and manipulating him and the two share an embrace. When asked about his parents' anger, Darwin claims that he had someone send an apology cake on his behalf. 

              Before going their separate ways, the two of them share in Darwin's secret handshake demonstrated earlier in the episode. The episode ends when Julius realizes the cake had sparklers, and fireworks appear in the distance, much to Julius' dismay.


              Watch the video: Secret society pizza party Tim King (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Fitzsimmons

    This is a convention

  2. Eginhardt

    Thanks for the explanation. All ingenious is simple.

  3. Gozil

    It was specially registered at a forum to tell to you thanks for support how I can thank you?



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